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“The U.S. National Cancer Institute should be admonished for publishing this study in their hallmark journal.” 

Information from Dr. Joel Moskowitz at University of California Berkeley
Electromagnetic Radiation Safety
March 30, 2022

“Like the earlier cell phone-brain tumor risk study that used data from the UK Million Women study (Benson et al., 2013), the current study (Schüz et al., 2022) is methodologically unsound due to limited assessment of cell phone use over time and misclassification of exposure. Furthermore, participant attrition from this prospective longitudinal study was very high which likely contributed to the fact that few participants in the main analysis were heavy lifetime cell phone users.

Thus, the study provides no assurance of safety to current cell phone users who use their phones more or start using at a younger age. The results of this study are also limited to the study population, namely middle-aged and elderly women who lived in the United Kingdom (UK).”

Unfortunately, those who only read the abstract will find the following disingenuous conclusion:
“Our findings support the accumulating evidence that cellular telephone use under usual conditions does not increase brain tumor incidence.”

The phrases, “accumulating evidence” and “under usual conditions” seem misleading given the limitations of the current study. Moreover, multiple case-control studies report increased brain tumor incidence with levels of cell phone use now considered quite common. The U.S. National Cancer Institute should be admonished for publishing this study in their hallmark journal, JNCI.

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https://ehtrust.org/46375-2/ Source: Environmental Health Trust